Chord manipulation (voicings, picking out notes, etc.)

#1

Been digging around the documentation and source (still learning Haskell so mb I missed something…) and couldn’t find an answer to this: is it possible to pick out specific notes in a chord? I know arp exists but something a bit more controllable, like say sequencing patterns picking from the root, 3rd, and 7th one cycle and then the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and octave the next.

On a somewhat related note, is it possible to achieve diff voicings on chords? Like take n "c4'maj e4'min" but drop the 5th on the e minor chord down an octave so it’s in second inversion and you get that C-B motion going?

Thanks!

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#2

I’ve wondered about this too. Currently, I’m not sure there is a good way to do the kind of manipulation your describing. However, you can lock patterns to scales and modes and select notes out of that.

For example, if you want to arpeggiate a Maj7 chord in a custom way you could write:

d1 $ note (scale "major" $ "2 0 -3 0 2 4 6 " ) #s "gtr"

You can write any pattern of notes you want and as long as you only include 0, 2, 4, 6, and any octave equivalent notes, it will be a Maj7 chord sound.

If you want EMin7 instead of c:

d1 $ note ((|+ "e")$scale "minor" $ "2 0 -3 0 2 4 6 " ) #s "gtr"

Or

d1 $ note (scale "major" $ "2 0 -3 0 2 4 6 " +3) #s "gtr"

depending on how you want to think about how the chord eminor fits in.

This approach might let you more easily specify those inversions you were asking about. It is more verbose though.

Does that help?

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#3

thx! yeah, i was already aware of the scales, I suppose I was trying to avoid the mental overhead of remembering the scale degrees for the chord tones but maybe that’s just me not doing it enough/being lazy/not wanting to remember the 0-indexed numbers rather than the non-computer world 1-indexed ones.

mb i’ll think/look about this more when I get comfier with haskell/look at the source more (mb looking at the arp code?).

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#4

Hey,
Go have a look at my project on Youtube it is called Ubiquité.
I explore chords and melody using specific note with the superpiano.
You will have to write something like
c4 e4 g4 b4 and b3 3e4 g4
and also take in account the syntax for the melody and the chord
The scale and numerical system is very hard to make sense when you work with more complex form.

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